ambrosia

Sep 16
I support this effort to get more awesome, excellent, mind-blowing STEM teachers in America. #blowminds #TeachSTEM http://thndr.it/1B2LkSf

I support this effort to get more awesome, excellent, mind-blowing STEM teachers in America. #blowminds #TeachSTEM http://thndr.it/1B2LkSf


Aug 31
Just in case you need to express Jesus tap dancing Christ on a cracker - Imgur

Just in case you need to express Jesus tap dancing Christ on a cracker - Imgur


Jul 14

spookyjoe:

saw-whet owls are very cute

(via sperose)


Jun 3

May 26

angieup:

sherlockedinthetardiswithcrowley:

thecopperscales:

sophspiration:

yerawizardmary:

onthepursuitforhappiness:

why would they edit so much?

They physically moved her bones. They moved her collar bone lower. I hope stuff like this makes girls realize how ridiculous the media is.

Even the ‘before’ picture is unattainable by most women. To begin with, she’s had her makeup and hair styled by professionals with expensive products. She’s also been given a flattering designer outfit, which is most likely altered to perfectly fit her shape. She has also been photographed in a fancy studio with perfect lighting and camera equipment, by an industry professional.

The fact that they would then go on to photoshop her beyond recognition (they even changed the appearance of her fingers, for crying out loud) just further emphasizes the unattainability of the media’s idea of ‘beauty’.

I am thoroughly disgusted by all this.

and its even worse because you know she hates this shit too

The look on her face — she is condemning them with her eyes for what she already knows they are up to. You can just see it in her expression. 


luckydreaming:

heysnap:

Violence & Silence: Jackson Katz, Ph.D at TEDxFiDiWomen …

Excellent.  Absolutely excellent, and the very best part, the part where he nailed it because I could never get past all the rest, is identifying that we need to ask questions about John, about what is going on with men.

I agree with the above statement, we need to start figuring out why men are hitting women, why are they raping women, and why a lot of them aren’t taking responsibility in it. You can have all of these women self defense classes and shit to get people to learn how to defend themselves from these acts but until you attack this at the root it’s just going to keep growing back.

(via angieup)


“What people don’t understand is when we say “Teach men not to rape,” we’re not talking about telling them not to jump out of the bushes in a ski mask and grab the nearest female. We’re talking about the way we teach boys that masculinity is measured by power over others, and that they aren’t men unless they “get some.” We’re talking about teaching men (and women) that it’s not okay to laugh at jokes about rape and abuse. We’re talking about telling men that a lack of “No” doesn’t mean “Yes,” that if a woman is too drunk to consent they shouldn’t touch her, that dating someone - or even being married to someone - does not mean automatic consent. We’re talking about teaching boys to pay attention to the girl they’re with, and if she looks uncomfortable to stop and ask if she’s okay, because sometimes girls don’t know how to say stop in a situation like that. We’re talking about how women have the right to change their mind. Even if she’s been saying yes all night, if she says no, that’s it. It’s over. That’s what we mean when we say “Teach men not to rape.”” THIS! (via angieup)

(via angieup)



May 21
smarterplanet:

 Better Information, Better Cities | Next American City
As a curator at the National Building Museum (NBM), Susan Piedmont-Palladino spends her days enticing the public to think critically about the built environment. In her past exhibitions “Green Community” and “Tools of the Imagination,” the trained architect studied the use of new technologies in our design of and interaction with urban places. Now Piedmont-Palladino is at the helm of Intelligent Cities, a multipronged effort that “explores the intersection of information technology and urban design to understand where we are, where we want to be, and how to get there.” The project, supported by NBM partners Time and IBM and funded by the Rockefeller Foundation, uses the museum’s website and social networking tools to gather public input with the purpose of gauging collective attitudes toward the built environment — ranging from the home to the city to the region and the nation. This June the museum will convene experts, officials and the public at the museum to discuss the results and how to apply them in cities; the museum will also publish a book and stage an exhibition to reveal the project’s findings. Here, Piedmont-Palladino offers a preview of the early results.
What are the goals of the Intelligent Cities initiative, and why did the NBM decide to pursue it?
Our mission is educating the public about the value of the built environment. This project sits well with our goals because it lets us think about the means and methods of educating the public, and how that works differently for people who come to the museum and those we reach through different media. The Intelligent Cities initiative is letting us really think about what’s at stake: How do we communicate with people about the full range of the built environment, from the living room to the infrastructure of the nation? The point we’re making is that we’ll all make better decisions if we have better information.

smarterplanet:

 Better Information, Better Cities | Next American City

As a curator at the National Building Museum (NBM), Susan Piedmont-Palladino spends her days enticing the public to think critically about the built environment. In her past exhibitions “Green Community” and “Tools of the Imagination,” the trained architect studied the use of new technologies in our design of and interaction with urban places. Now Piedmont-Palladino is at the helm of Intelligent Cities, a multipronged effort that “explores the intersection of information technology and urban design to understand where we are, where we want to be, and how to get there.” The project, supported by NBM partners Time and IBM and funded by the Rockefeller Foundation, uses the museum’s website and social networking tools to gather public input with the purpose of gauging collective attitudes toward the built environment — ranging from the home to the city to the region and the nation. This June the museum will convene experts, officials and the public at the museum to discuss the results and how to apply them in cities; the museum will also publish a book and stage an exhibition to reveal the project’s findings. Here, Piedmont-Palladino offers a preview of the early results.

What are the goals of the Intelligent Cities initiative, and why did the NBM decide to pursue it?

Our mission is educating the public about the value of the built environment. This project sits well with our goals because it lets us think about the means and methods of educating the public, and how that works differently for people who come to the museum and those we reach through different media. The Intelligent Cities initiative is letting us really think about what’s at stake: How do we communicate with people about the full range of the built environment, from the living room to the infrastructure of the nation? The point we’re making is that we’ll all make better decisions if we have better information.


May 18

thefrogman:

World’s Best Father by Dave Engledow
[tumblr | twitter | facebook | fotoblur]

(via wilwheaton)


Page 1 of 22